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 Easter Stories and Poems

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PostSubject: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:35 pm

Waitin' For The Bunny...

I'm here waitin' for the bunny,
On this Easter Day.
I'm here waitin' for the bunny,
Just to bring some eggs my way.
I can see my Easter basket,
Filled with candy and a toy!
Oh, the Easter Bunny's comin',
Bringing Easter joy.

Bunny's on her way!
Bunny's on her way!
Hop-Hip-Hoppin' down the trail-the trail.

Bunny's on her way
Bunny's on her way.
Wearin' that ball-of-cotton tail.

I'm here waitin' for the bunny
On this Easter Day.
I'm here waitin' for the bunny,
Just to bring some eggs my way.
I can see my Easter basket,
Filled with candy and a toy!
Oh, the Easter Bunny's comin',
Bringing Easter joy.


Story By Grandpa Tucker
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:38 pm











THE TALE OF


PETER RABBIT


BY


BEATRIX POTTER






A PRESENTATION


OF THE


OHIO
UNIVERSITY
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
CENTER


ATHENS, OHIO







ONCE upon a time there were four little Rabbits, and their names were
Flopsy,
Mopsy,
Cotton-tail,
and Peter.


They lived with their Mother in a sand-bank, underneath the root of a very big fir-tree.






'Now, my dears,' said old Mrs. Rabbit one morning, 'you may go into the fields or down the lane, but don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden: your Father had an accident there; he was put in a pie by Mrs. McGregor.'






'Now run along, and don't get into mischief. I am going out.'







Then old Mrs. Rabbit took a basket and her umbrella, and went through the wood to the baker's. She bought a loaf of brown bread and five currant buns.







Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cotton-tail, who were good little bunnies, went down the lane to gather blackberries:






But Peter, who was very naughty, ran straight to Mr. McGregor's garden, and squeezed under the gate!






First he ate some lettuces and some French beans; and then he ate some radishes;






And then, feeling rather sick, he went to look for some parsley.






But round the end of a cucumber frame, whom should he meet but Mr. McGregor!






Mr. McGregor was on his hands and knees planting out young cabbages, but he jumped up and ran after Peter, waving a rake and calling out, 'Stop thief!'






Peter was most dreadfully frightened; he rushed all over the garden, for he had forgotten the way back to the gate.


He lost one of his shoes among the cabbages, and the other shoe amongst the potatoes.






After losing them, he ran on four legs and went faster, so that I think he might have got away altogether if he had not unfortunately run into a gooseberry net, and got caught by the large buttons on his jacket. It was a blue jacket with brass buttons, quite new.






Peter gave himself up for lost, and shed big tears; but his sobs were overheard by some friendly sparrows, who flew to him in great excitement, and implored him to exert himself.







Mr. McGregor came up with a sieve, which he intended to pop upon the top of Peter; but Peter wriggled out just in time, leaving his jacket behind him.






And rushed into the tool-shed, and jumped into a can. It would have been a beautiful thing to hide in, if it had not so much water in it.






Mr. McGregor was quite sure that Peter was somewhere in the tool-shed, perhaps hidden underneath a flower-pot. He began to turn them over carefully, looking under each.


Presently Peter sneezed - 'Kertyschoo!' Mr. McGregor was after him in no time.






And tried to put a foot upon Peter, who jumped out of a window, upsetting three plants. The window was too small for Mr. McGregor, and he was tired of running after Peter. He went back to his work.






Peter sat down to rest; he was out of breath and trembling with fright, and he had not the least idea which way to go. Also he was very damp with sitting in that can.


After a time he began to wander about, going lippity - lippity - not very fast, and looking all around.






He found a door in a wall; but it was locked, and there was no room for a fat little rabbit to squeeze underneath.


An old mouse was running in and out over the stone doorstep, carrying peas and beans to her family in the wood. Peter asked her the way to the gate, but she had such a large pea in her mouth that she could not answer. She only shook her head at him. Peter began to cry.






Then he tried to find his way straight across the garden, but he became more and more puzzled. Presently, he came to a pond where Mr. McGregor filled his water-cans. A white cat was staring at some gold-fish, she sat very, very still, but now and then the tip of her tail twitched as if it were alive. Peter thought it best to go away without speaking to her; he had heard about cats from his cousin, little Benjamin Bunny.


Continued Below

 
 
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:39 pm









 





He went back towards the tool-shed, but suddenly, quite close to him, he heard the noise of a hoe - scr-r-ritch, scratch, scratch, scritch. Peter scuttered underneath the bushes. But presently, as nothing happened, he came out, and climbed upon a wheel-barrow and peeped over. The first thing he saw was Mr. McGregor hoeing onions. His back was turned towards Peter, and beyond him was the gate!







Peter got down very quietly off the wheel-barrow, and started running as fast as he could go, along a straight walk behind some black-currant bushes.


Mr. McGregor caught sight of him at the corner but Peter did not care. He slipped underneath the gate, and was safe at last in the wood outside the garden.







Mr. McGregor hung up the little jacket and the shoes for a scare-crow to frighten the blackbirds.







Peter never stopped running or looked behind him till he got home to the big fir-tree.


He was so tired that he flopped down upon the nice soft sand on the floor of the rabbit-hole, and shut his eyes. His mother was busy cooking; she wondered what he had done with his clothes. It was the second little jacket and pair of shoes that Peter had lost in a fortnight.







I am sorry to say that Peter was not very well during the evening.


His mother put him to bed, and made some camomile tea; and she gave a dose of it to Peter!


'One tablespoon to be taken at bed-time.'






But Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cotton-tail had bread and milk and blackberries, for supper.


THE END.

 
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:40 pm

The Magical Easter Egg


written by Debbie Williamson


(published in the EMC Record News, Smith Falls, Ontario - April 4, 1993)

A very long, long time ago, there lived an old man, who made chocolate Easter eggs. His name was Mr. Jones. He lived in a pretty castle in the hills of Europe.
Mr. Jones was preparing for the big Easter season that was fast approaching. He had many pots sitting on top of a roaring fire. Big chunks of chocolate were melting in the pots.
While Mr. Jones waited for the chocolate to melt, which took a very long time indeed, he was busy preparing the moulds. He had previously carved all of the moulds from wood.
Mr. Jones had to make sure that each mould was clean. Once the moulds were ready and the chocolate melted, Mr. Jones carefully ladled the hot mixture into each mould. Then, he let the moulds cool.
Once the moulds had cooled, Mr. Jones carefully lifted each Easter egg out of its mould. He decorated each egg individually. He used white, pink, blue, yellow and green coloured icing. He made many different shapes on his eggs, like stars, diamonds, circles and triangles.
Mr. Jones laid each decorated egg onto a flat table. He had oval shaped eggs, bunny rabbit shaped eggs, and teddy bear shaped eggs, too. One particular teddy bear shaped egg came to life. He could walk and talk and lift his arms.
"Hey!" the teddy bear egg exclaimed. "I'm alive."
At first, Mr. Jones never heard the teddy bear egg so, he continued with his work.
"Can't you hear me?" the teddy bear egg asked.
"What was that?" Mr. Jones asked as he stopped working and scratched his head in amazement. "Ah, I must be hearing things."
"Look over here," said the little bear. "I'm on your packing table."
Mr. Jones turned his head toward the table and there, he found the chocolate teddy bear walking around.
"Who you are?" asked Mr. Jones.
"I am a teddy bear," the bear explained. "I need your help."
"What are you talking about?" asked Mr. Jones. "You just come walking into my workshop and expect me to help you!"
"I didn't just walk into your workshop," said the bear. "You created me. I came out of that mould over there."
The bear pointed to the mould. Mr. Jones went over to it and picked it up. He examined it carefully. The bear was telling the truth. He found no trace of the chocolate mixture that he knew he had poured into that mould.
"How come you're alive?" Mr. Jones asked.
The Easter angel came and sprinkled some star-dust on me," the bear explained. "She sent me on a mission. She filled me with magical powers."
Mr. Jones did not want to believe the bear so, he continued to work.
Hey there!" the bear yelled. "Don't you want to hear about my mission!"
"Well, don't you yell at me," Mr. Jones screamed at the bear. "Where are your manners? I'd prefer it if you would call me by my name. I don't like to be called, 'Hey there!'. My name is Mr. Jones."
"Look Mr. Jones," said the bear. "The Easter angel told me that you are the only person that can help me."
"Oh!" cried Mr. Jones. "I give up. Now, what is this mission of yours all about?"
"Well," said the bear sadly. "There is a little girl down in the village who is very sick. The angel wants you to send me to her, so she can get well again. The Easter angel has put some magical powers in me that will restore the girl's health."
"That is simple enough," Mr. Jones said. "I can take you there first thing in the morning."
"I'm sorry Mr. Jones," the bear said sadly. "There is no way that this can wait until tomorrow morning. If you don't take me there by midnight tonight, I will lose my magical powers and the poor little girl may die."
Mr. Jones looked at his clock. He had only ten minutes to get the bear to the girl. He grabbed him and rushed outside to his truck. It was one minute to midnight when Mr. Jones and the bear were at the bedside of the sick little girl.
The bear had magically turned back into a teddy bear shaped egg.
Mr. Jones laid the egg across the little girl's lap. Weakly, she sat up.
"Oh," she said, not having much strength left in her frail body. "I see the Easter angel has answered my prayers."
Quickly, the little girl devoured the chocolate egg. She had just finished the last bite, when the clock struck twelve.
"Oh sir," she said happily, her strength already starting to return. "You saved my life!"
"Little girl," Mr. Jones started to say.
"You can call me Cheryl," the little girl said.
"Cheryl, it was my pleasure to save your life," Mr. Jones said happily with tears of joy running down his face.
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:40 pm

THE LITTLE HALF-CHICK
There was once upon a time a Spanish Hen, who hatched out some nice little chickens. She was much pleased with their looks as they came from the shell. One, two, three, came out plump and fluffy; but when the fourth shell broke, out came a little half-chick! It had only one leg and one wing and one eye! It was just half a chicken.
The Hen-mother did not know what in the world to do with the queer little Half-Chick. She was afraid something would happen to it, and she tried hard to protect it and keep it from harm. But as soon as it could walk the little Half-Chick showed a most headstrong spirit, worse than any of its brothers. It would not mind, and it would go wherever it wanted to; it walked with a funny little hoppity-kick, hoppity-kick, and got along pretty fast.
One day the little Half-Chick said, "Mother, I am off to Madrid, to see the King! Good-by.''
The poor Hen-mother did everything she could think of, to keep him from doing so foolish a thing, but the little Half-Chick laughed at her naughtily. "I'm for seeing the King,'' he said; "this life is too quiet for me.'' And away he went, hoppity-kick, hoppity-kick, over the fields.
When he had gone some distance the little Half-Chick came to a little brook that was caught in the weeds and in much trouble.
"Little Half-Chick,'' whispered the Water, "I am so choked with these weeds that I cannot move; I am almost lost, for want of room; please push the sticks and weeds away with your bill and help me.''
"The idea!'' said the little Half-Chick. "I cannot be bothered with you; I am off for Madrid, to see the King!'' And in spite of the brook's begging he went away, hoppity-kick, hoppity-kick.
A bit farther on, the Half-Chick came to a Fire, which was smothered in damp sticks and in great distress.
"Oh, little Half-Chick,'' said the Fire, "you are just in time to save me. I am almost dead for want of air. Fan me a little with your wing, I beg.''
"The idea!'' said the little Half-Chick. "I cannot be bothered with you; I am off to Madrid, to see the King!'' And he went laughing off, hoppity-kick, hoppity-kick.
When he had hoppity-kicked a good way, and was near Madrid, he came to a clump of bushes, where the Wind was caught fast. The Wind was whimpering, and begging to be set free.
"Little Half-Chick,'' said the Wind, "you are just in time to help me; if you will brush aside these twigs and leaves, I can get my breath; help me, quickly!''
"Ho! the idea!'' said the little Half-Chick. "I have no time to bother with you. I am going to Madrid, to see the King.'' And he went off, hoppity-kick, hoppity-kick, leaving the Wind to smother.
After a while he came to Madrid and to the palace of the King. Hoppity-kick, hoppity-kick, the little Half-Chick skipped past the sentry at the gate, and hoppity-kick, hoppity-kick, he crossed the court. But as he was passing the windows of the kitchen the Cook looked out and saw him.
"The very thing for the King's dinner!'' she said. "I was needing a chicken!'' And she seized the little Half-Chick by his one wing and threw him into a kettle of water on the fire.
The Water came over the little Half-Chick's feathers, over his head, into his eyes; It was terribly uncomfortable. The little Half-Chick cried out, --
"Water, don't drown me! Stay down, don't come so high!''
But the Water said, "Little Half-Chick, little Half-Chick, when I was in trouble you would not help me,'' and came higher than ever.
Now the Water grew warm, hot, hotter, frightfully hot; the little Half-Chick cried out, "Do not burn so hot, Fire! You are burning me to death! Stop!''
But the Fire said, "Little Half-Chick, little Half-Chick, when I was in trouble you would not help me,'' and burned hotter than ever.
Just as the little Half-Chick thought he must suffocate, the Cook took the cover off, to look at the dinner. "Dear me,'' she said, "this chicken is no good; it is burned to a cinder.'' And she picked the little Half-Chick up by one leg and threw him out of the window.
In the air he was caught by a breeze and taken up higher than the trees. Round and round he was twirled till he was so dizzy he thought he must perish. "Don't blow me so? Wind,'' he cried, "let me down!''
"Little Half-Chick, little Half-Chick,'' said the Wind, "when I was in trouble you would not help me!'' And the Wind blew him straight up to the top of the church steeple, and stuck him there, fast!
There he stands to this day, with his one eye, his one wing, and his one leg. He cannot hoppity-kick any more, but he turns slowly round when the wind blows, and keeps his head toward it, to hear what it says.
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:41 pm

The Easter Bunnies Twin Brother


written by Debbie Williamson


(published in the EMC Record News, Smith Falls, Ontario - April 11, 1993)

Easter was fast approaching. The Easter Bunny was down in his den. He was preparing all the chocolates and candies that he would be handing out to all the boys and girls that had been good.
Deep down in another den on the other side of the forest, was another bunny. This bunny was the Easter Bunny's twin brother. His name was Freddy.
Freddy was jealous of his twin brother because of all the publicity and fame that he had been receiving. The Easter Bunny had always been a good little bunny. He had never caused any trouble. However, Freddy was another story. He had been nothing but trouble from the day he was born. In fact, he had caused so much trouble that his parents had abandoned him. The Easter Bunny never knew that he had a twin brother. As far as he knew, he was an only child.
"I can make a better Easter basket than my twin brother," Freddy remarked to himself, one day. "I know what children want for Easter. They are getting tired of chocolate and candy. They want something different."
Over the next few days, Freddy went to work. He made little racing cars for the boys and he made fancy little dresses for the girls. He worked very hard and he managed to have everything ready just in time.
The Easter Bunny delivered his Easter chocolates and candy to all the boys and girls on his list. Freddy followed closely behind and delivered his gifts.
On Easter morning, the children loved their special surprises. They sat down right away and wrote thank you letters to the Easter Bunny.
The Easter Bunny was very surprised when he read the thousands of letters that he had received. The children were not only thanking him for the usual chocolates and candies that he had given them, but they were also thanking him for the racing cars and the fancy dresses.
"What is going on here?" the Easter Bunny asked himself. "I didn't leave the children any toys or clothing. I left them chocolates and candies. Toys and clothing, eh. Um, what a wonderful idea!"
Since the Easter Bunny was a very honest bunny, he decided that he would find out who had come up with the wonderful idea. He did not want to steal anyone's idea.
The next Easter, the Easter Bunny went to work as usual. He delivered a lot of fine chocolate Easter eggs and brightly coloured candies to all the children. When he came to the very last house, he hid behind a rocking chair instead of going home. In about fifteen minutes, another bunny entered the house. He had a basket with him. The Easter Bunny saw the bunny take a beautiful dress out of the basket. Then, the bunny took a wooden fire engine out of the basket.
"Who are you?" asked the Easter Bunny, coming out from behind his hiding place.
"Oh," said Freddy. "Hi! I'm your twin brother, Freddy."
"My twin brother!" exclaimed the Easter Bunny. "That's impossible."
Freddy told the Easter Bunny his whole sad story.
"Why did I have to be such a bad bunny?" Freddy cried. "Why couldn't I have been more like you?"
"Freddy," said the Easter Bunny. "You are like me."
"No," said Freddy. "I'm mean and cruel. You are kind and gentle."
"That's not true," said the Easter Bunny. "Look at all the toys and pretty dresses that you have made for the children. Anybody that can do all that is not mean. What you have done is a very unselfish act of kindness."
"Really," said Freddy.
"Really," said the Easter Bunny. "You have brought so much joy to the children with your gifts."
The Easter Bunny showed Freddy one of the letters that he had received. Tears came to Freddy's eyes when he read it.
"Wow!" said Freddy. "They really like the things I made for them!"
"Yes, twin brother," said the Easter Bunny. "They do. Now, what do you say we go into business together. You can continue making all your gifts and I'll continue to make the chocolate and the candies."
"Great idea!" said Freddy.
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:42 pm

Peter Cottontail

- Beatrix Potter

Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,
Hippity, hoppity,
Easter's on its way.

Bringin' every girl and boy Baskets full of Easter joy,
Things to make your Easter bright and gay.
He's got jelly beans for Tommy,
Colored eggs for sister Sue,
There's an orchid for your Mommy
And an Easter bonnet, too.

Oh! here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,
Hippity hoppity,
Happy Easter day.

Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,
Look at him stop,
and listen to him say:
"Try to do the things you should."
Maybe if you're extra good,
He'll roll lots of Easter eggs your way.

You'll wake up on Easter morning
And you'll know that he was there
When you find those choc'late bunnies
That he's hiding ev'rywhere.

Oh! here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,
Hippity hoppity,
Happy Easter day.
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:43 pm


JELLYBEAN SOUP




We're camping out,
What a lucky group.
We're going to dine
On jelly bean soup.

We'll cook those beans
Till they're red hot.
Add M&Ms
To fill up the pot.

We'll eat that soup
And when we're through,
We'll have our tasty
Marshmallow stew.

We'll pick our teeth
With a Tootsie Roll.
Tomorrow it's
Chocolate casserole!
—Grandpa Tucker
Copyright ©1998 Bob Tucker
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:44 pm

The Jelly Bean Prayer


Red
is for the blood He gave,

Green
is for the grass He made,

Yellow
i
s for the sun so bright,

Orange
is for the edge of night.



Black
is for the sins that were made

White
is for the grace He gave,

Purple
is for the hour of sorrow,

Pink
is for the new tomorrow.

Give a bag of jelly beans,
Colorful and sweet,
Tell them it's a Prayer...
It's a Promise...
It's an Easter Treat !

Contributed by UnsaddledRainbow




Jellybean Prayer


Red is for the blood He gave
Green is for the grass He made
Yellow is for the sun so bright
Orange is for the edge of night
Black is for the sins we made
White is for the grace He gave
Purple is for the house of sorrow
Pink is for the new tomorrow

A bag of jellybeans
colorful and sweet
In this prayer is a promise
And a small delicious treat.




JELLY BEAN POEM

Little jelly beans
Tell a story true.
A tale of Father's love
Just for me and you.

GREEN is for the waving palms.
YELLOW is for the sun above.
BROWN is for the soft earth where
People sat hearing of HIS love.

A SPECKLED bean for fish and sand.
RED for precious wine and
BLACK is for the sin
He washed from you soul and mine.

PURPLE'S for the sadness of
HIS family and His friends,
WHITE is for the glory of
The Day HE rose again.

Now that you've heard the story
You know what each color means.
The story of our Father's love
Told by some jelly beans.
So every morning take a bean
They're really very yummy.
Something for the soul, you see
And something for the tummy.


Happy Easter
[/center]
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PostSubject: Re: Easter Stories and Poems   Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:45 pm

Easter Isn't Easy


I heard a funny bunny say,
"I just go nuts on Easter day.
I hide about a zillion eggs
And baskets tangle up my legs.

"I'm tired, my eyes are full of tears
And overflowing to my ears.
If I'm to work more Easter Days
At my age I should change my ways

"I know I must do something rash
So I'll start saving all my cash
Then next year, with a little luck
I'll deliver in my pick up truck."

Poem by Grandpa Tucker
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